Our Exhibits.

Levine Museum presents a variety of interactive and immersive exhibits covering the history and cultures of the New South from the end of the Civil War in 1865 to today. Cotton Fields to Skyscrapers takes museum-goers on a journey of stories from Reconstruction, the transformation of the southern economy from agriculture to industrialization, the Civil Rights Era, and the booming growth of the urban landscapes and new populations of today’s Charlotte. Temporary exhibitions focus on a variety of stories about Charlotte past and present.


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COTTON FIELDS TO SKYSCRAPERS


The centerpiece of Levine Museum is the award-winning exhibit, Cotton Fields to Skyscrapers: Reinventing Charlotte and the Carolina Piedmont in the New South. Spanning 8,000 square feet and including more than 1,000 artifacts, images, video clips, music, and oral histories, the exhibit uses Charlotte and its 13 surrounding counties as a case study to illustrate the profound changes in the South since the Civil War.

Visitors enjoy an interactive, hands-on experience as they tour 6 different "environments" within the exhibit.

  • Step inside a one-room tenant farmer's house
  • Run a hand through a pile of seed cotton
  • Listen to the churning of the cotton mill
  • Play checkers on the front porch of a mill house
  • Sit in Good Samaritans Hospital Chapel, one of the first African American hospitals in the South
  • Walk down main street and try on a hat in an early Belk department store
  • Sit at a lunch counter and hear personal accounts from local sit-in leaders

Book A Group Tour

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COTTON FIELDS TO SKYSCRAPERS


The centerpiece of Levine Museum is the award-winning exhibit, Cotton Fields to Skyscrapers: Reinventing Charlotte and the Carolina Piedmont in the New South. Spanning 8,000 square feet and including more than 1,000 artifacts, images, video clips, music, and oral histories, the exhibit uses Charlotte and its 13 surrounding counties as a case study to illustrate the profound changes in the South since the Civil War.

Visitors enjoy an interactive, hands-on experience as they tour 6 different "environments" within the exhibit.

  • Step inside a one-room tenant farmers house
  • Run a hand through a pile of seed cotton
  • Listen to the churning of the cotton mill
  • Play checkers on the front porch of a mill house
  • Sit in Good Samaritans Hospital Chapel, one of the first African-American hospitals in the South
  • Walk down main street and try on a hat in an early Belk department store
  • Sit at a lunch counter and hear personal accounts from local sit-in leaders

BOOK A GROUP TOUR
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BROOKLYN: ONCE A CITY WITHIN A CITY


Levine Museum of the New South goes to Brooklyn, adding this rich historic neighborhood to its current exhibit #HomeCLT: People. Places. Promises a multilayered exhibit that explores Charlotte’s neighborhoods as they’ve grown and changed over time through Augmented Reality experiences that bring the stories alive.

Brooklyn: Once a City Within a City, explores the rise and demise of Charlotte’s Brooklyn neighborhood, once the most thriving and vibrant black community in the Carolinas.

Brooklyn gives voice to the memories of former residents and community members. The exhibit encourages reflection about a place that provided opportunities and sanctuary for African Americans, and explores the consequences of urban renewal and what a community may lose in the name of progress and growth. Visitors will also learn about the politics that further segregated the city and deepened the economic opportunity gap that Charlotte continues to struggle with today.


View Brooklyn Videos
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BROOKLYN: ONCE A CITY WITHIN A CITY


Levine Museum of the New South goes to Brooklyn, adding this rich historic neighborhood to its current exhibit #HomeCLT: People. Places. Promises a multilayered exhibit that explores Charlotte’s neighborhoods as they’ve grown and changed over time through Augmented Reality experiences that bring the stories alive.

Brooklyn: Once a City Within a City, explores the rise and demise of Charlotte’s Brooklyn neighborhood, once the most thriving and vibrant black community in the Carolinas.

Brooklyn gives voice to the memories of former residents and community members. The exhibit encourages reflection about a place that provided opportunities and sanctuary for African Americans, and explores the consequences of urban renewal and what a community may lose in the name of progress and growth. Visitors will also learn about the politics that further segregated the city and deepened the economic opportunity gap that Charlotte continues to struggle with today.


VIEW BROOKLYN VIDEO

IT HAPPENED HERE: LYNCHING AND REMEMBRANCE


It Happened Here builds on the Equal Justice Initiative’s research into the history of lynching across America, situating Mecklenburg County’s two recorded lynchings and the local effort to memorialize the victims within the national conversation.

The exhibit also features AN OUTRAGE, a documentary filmed on-location at lynching sites in six states and bolstered by the memories and perspectives of descendants, community activists, and scholars.



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IT HAPPENED HERE: LYNCHING AND REMEMBRANCE


It Happened Here builds on the Equal Justice Initiative’s research into the history of lynching across America, situating Mecklenburg County’s two recorded lynchings and the local effort to memorialize the victims within the national conversation.

The exhibit also features AN OUTRAGE, a documentary filmed on-location at lynching sites in six states and bolstered by the memories and perspectives of descendants, community activists, and scholars.



#HOMECLT: PEOPLE. PLACES. PROMISES.


#HomeCLT is an exhibit series rooted in the stories of Charlotte’s neighborhoods. #HomeCLT aims to show the city in the words of its diverse residents, to reveal the unexpected, to prompt reflection and dialogue, and to inspire civic participation as Charlotte strives to build a more equitable future.

The first iteration of #HomeCLT includes the stories of the Eastland Mall, Enderly Park, Hidden Valley, Dilworth and Sedgefield neighborhoods. Through an Augmented Reality app developed by Dr. Ming-Chun Lee of UNC Charlotte’s College of Arts and Architecture, visitors will “see” the demographic changes in these neighborhoods occur over time as visuals and graphics are projected on their phones and other devices.

The exhibit includes a video recording booth where visitors can tell their own stories of the neighborhoods they have shaped and that have shaped them. It also features work by Charlotte photographer, Alvin C. Jacobs, Jr., and videographer, David Butler, and is made possible by generous support from lead sponsor, Crescent Communities.


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#HOMECLT: PEOPLE. PLACES. PROMISES.

Exhibition Prototype Launch.

This exhibition will continue to grow, change and evolve over time. Give us feedback, help us test a new Augmented Reality app, share your own stories and join the conversation about Charlotte’s future!

#HomeCLT is an exhibit series rooted in the stories of Charlotte’s neighborhoods. #HomeCLT aims to show the city in the words of its diverse residents, to reveal the unexpected, to prompt reflection and dialogue, and to inspire civic participation as Charlotte strives to build a more equitable future.

The first iteration of #HomeCLT includes the stories of the Eastland Mall, Enderly Park, Hidden Valley, Dilworth and Sedgefield neighborhoods. Through an Augmented Reality app developed by Dr. Ming-Chun Lee of UNC Charlotte’s College of Arts and Architecture, visitors will “see” the demographic changes in these neighborhoods occur over time as visuals and graphics are projected on their phones and other devices.

The exhibit includes a video recording booth where visitors can tell their own stories of the neighborhoods they have shaped and that have shaped them. It also features work by Charlotte photographer, Alvin C. Jacobs, Jr., and videographer, David Butler, and is made possible by generous support from lead sponsor, Crescent Communities.


LUMBEE INDIANS: A PEOPLE AND A PLACE


Levine Museum of the New South’s latest exhibit, Lumbee Indians: A People and a Place, explores Lumbee people and culture in portraiture.

Curated by Nancy Strickland Fields, Director of UNC Pembroke’s Museum of the Southeast American Indian, this visual narrative of the Lumbee tells a history and experience of family and home, land and water, faith and memory.

Exhibit opened Saturday, November 14, 2020.



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LUMBEE INDIANS: A PEOPLE AND A PLACE



Levine Museum of the New South’s latest exhibit, Lumbee Indians: A People and a Place, explores Lumbee people and culture in portraiture. Curated by Nancy Strickland Fields, Director of UNC Pembroke’s Museum of the Southeast American Indian, this visual narrative of the Lumbee tells a history and experience of family and home, land and water, faith and memory. Exhibit opened Saturday, November 14, 2020.