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Comic Stripped
Kudzu, created by artist Doug Marlette, was the first major Southern comic strip to be originated by a native Southerner.
Exhibit Dates:
9/7/2007 -
5/25/2008
Comic Stripped: A Revealing Look at Southern Stereotypes in Cartoons
There is a South that we all carry in our minds. Let's call it the Stereotype South. The Stereotype South is created by popular culture – images and ideas that bombard us from movies, novels, tv, cartoons. It is not necessarily real, but it still shapes and informs how we see the South.

Beginning with the Reconstruction-era drawings of pioneering political artist Thomas Nast in the 1860s, cartoonists have shaped popular notions of "The South." Snuffy Smith and Lil' Abner, Pogo and Kudzu, Song of the South and King Of The Hill all convey images of southern life and people that each of us carry with us, whether we grew up here or arrived from afar. Comic Stripped: A Revealing Look at Southern Stereotypes in Cartoons is a new original exhibit created by Levine Museum historian Dr. Tom Hanchett, with assistance from locally-based cartoonists Jim Scancarelli (Gasoline Alley) and Marcus Hamilton (Dennis The Menace). The exhibit will feature art from the comic strips that have helped define the South, including cartoons from the 1860s to the present day, such as works from Thomas Nast, Al Capp ('Lil Abner) and Walt Kelly (POGO), Doug Marlette (Kudzu), Jim Scancarelli (Gasoline Alley) and Marcus Hamilton (Dennis the Menace).

In addition to the art, visitors will enjoy text and interactives that further explore the notion of Southern stereotypes.
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